DELIGHT

Tim Brister —  February 10, 2014 — 1 Comment

  • In the way of your testimonies I delight as much as in all riches. – Psalm 119:14
  • I will delight in your statutes; I will not forget your word. – Psalm 119:16
  • Your testimonies are my delight; they are my counselors. – Psalm 119:24
  • Lead me in the path of your commandments, for I delight in it. – Psalm 119:35
  • for I find my delight in your commandments, which I love. – Psalm 119:47
  • Let your mercy come to me, that I may live; for your law is my delight. – Psalm 119:77
  • If your law had not been my delight, I would have perished in my affliction. – Psalm 119:92
  • Trouble and anguish have found me out, but your commandments are my delight. – Psalm 119:143
  • I long for your salvation, O Lord, and your law is my delight. – Psalm 119:174

What’s your relationship to God’s ways? Delighting in His testimonies.
What’s your relationship to God’s Word? Delighting in His law.
What’s your relationship to Christ’s kingly rule? Delighting in His commands.

May our Christian lives be marked with a dominant delight in God!

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There’s a lot of pressure today for pastors and leaders to build their “platform” in order to gain an audience and build influence. This is especially true if you are seeking to publish a book. With all the encouragement to self-promote and brand your identity online, how does this relate to the gospel call of taking up your cross and denying yourself? How do we make much of Christ when it seems so necessary to make much of our work?

On Tuesday, April 8th the 2014 Band of Bloggers with gather to fellowship together at Heritage Hall on the campus of Southern Seminary and discuss the important topic of “Platform Building and the Gospel.” Justin Taylor, Joe Thorn, Trevin Wax, and Denny Burk will share their thoughts as Collin Hansen facilitates the discussion many of us are already having online.

Registration is just $15 and includes Chick-fil-A lunch. As we have been known to do in the past, we will do our best to provide you will a bag full of great books and resources to take with you. You will not want to miss this gathering of bloggers, publishers, authors, and church leaders across the world.

Seated is limited, so register soon! Hope to see you there!

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Growing up in North Alabama, I remember going through specific routines in the event of an emergency. I doubt there was a kid who did not know why or when you need to stop, drop, and roll. We were trained in protocols in the event of a tornado, calmly lining up in the hallway and securing our heads from potential debris. We knew how to exit the buildings in case of a fire in a single-file line to safe zones outside. All of these procedures were responses to various kinds of potential disasters we could encounter while in school.

Now what, do you think, are the possibilities that I as a kid in elementary school would actually need to follow through on those drills? How often would a tornado tear through our building? How often would a fire consume the classrooms? Hardly ever, it at all, right? But we were still trained in how to respond in the very unlikely event that they might occur.

What if I told you that on a daily basis you are going to be faced with potential crises or disasters that required a response from you? What if it was not a distant potentiality but an eminent reality? How would you prepare yourself for such situations? Would you be trained to know how to respond?

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Part 1: Relief and Development
Part 2: Incarnational Mission | Word and Deed | Responsibility and Sovereignty

In this final part of my reflections of integral mission from the life of Jesus, I want to turn once more to Luke 9:1-17 for some further observations related to the church. We see from the feeding of the multitude that Jesus had a plan and a people. He had provision and power to do all that was needed to see that the people were cared for and utterly satisfied.

STRATEGIC & SUPERNATURAL

When Jesus went about feeding the multitude, it is interesting that before He performed the miracle, He instructed His disciples to have the people to sit down in groups of 50. Seems like an unnecessary detail Luke included, no? Well, actually I find it really beneficial for integral mission. Jesus could have feed 20,000 in an unhelpful sea of chaos and confusion, but instead He chose a method that would best serve the people and make the greatest impact. I don’t want to read too much into this observation, but I believe it is accurate to say that this represents a strategic plan. Following this strategy came the supernatural work of God.

There are some who might think that strategic thinking and planning is unspiritual. Some may argue that it leads to pragmatism or doing work without God. While that is possible, simply because it has led some to pragmatism does not necessarily mean that it causes it. In fact, those working in difficult situations must have a strategic plan in place or the work will fall apart on its own. Having said that, we should pray and believe God to do what only He can do. He puts us in desperate situations where, if He does not come through, we are sunk. If you are not in a place where you are desperate and dependent on the sovereign, supernatural work of God, then you are in the wrong place.

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In my first post, I shared how Jesus demonstrated integral mission by balancing and affirming relief and development in His earthly ministry. Drawing from the same text (Luke 9:1-17), I want to continue with more observations for integral mission from the life and ministry of Jesus.

INCARNATIONAL MISSION

God sent His Son to die on the cross for our sins. God also sent His Son to dwell among us (John 1:14) so that we could see His glory. In Luke 9, we find Jesus in a desolate place among scores of people with all kinds of needs. While it may be easy to overlook this, let us not play it down. Jesus made Himself accessible to everyone in society, especially those on the margins. He was accessible and approachable, even for those who could not walk (the lame) and those who could not be touched (the lepers). Even those in the grave were not beyond the scope of Jesus’ reach!

Jesus had a plan. It was to pour into His disciples. Yet the multitudes pressed in on Him. What would He do? Would he tell them to get in a line and schedule an appointment with one of His disciples? According to Luke 9:11, Jesus welcomed them. He welcomed them because He was with them. He was with them because He was for them.

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