More from D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones on Jonathan Edwards, this time focusing on “the secret of this man.”

“What then was the secret of this man?  I have no hesitation in saying this: the spiritual always controlled the intellectual in him.  I believe he must have had a great struggle with his towering intellect, and his original thinking. . . . But as they put it, theology kept breaking in.  But that constitutes the special glory of this man–and this is what explains him–that he always kept his philosophy and his speculations subservient to the Bible and regarded them as mere servants.  Whatever he might be tempted to think, the Bible was supreme: everything was subordinate to the Word of God.  All his rich and brilliant gifts were not only held to be subservient, but were used as servants.  In other words he was God-dominated.”

– D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, The Puritans: Their Origins and Successors (Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth, 1987), 356.