Book Alert: He Who Gives Life

Tim Brister —  August 23, 2007 — 2 Comments

Title: He Who Gives Life: The Doctrine of the Holy Spirit
Author: Graham A. Cole
Publisher: Crossway
Release Date: August 16, 2007
Pages: 320
Format: Hardcover
ISBN 10-digit: n/a
ISBN 13-digit: 9781581347920
Retail Price: $30.00
Table of Contents: YES (here)
Intro: YES (here)
Sample Chapter: YES (here)

From Crossway:

Often the most misunderstood, and therefore ignored, member of the Trinity, the Holy Spirit deserves our attention and understanding. God the Father and God the Son rightfully garner much explanation and exploration, and God the Holy Spirit ought to be given the same studiousness, curiosity, and scholarship. In this addition to Crossway’s Foundations of Evangelical Theology series, Dr. Graham Cole has written a work that offers a comprehensive theology of the Holy Spirit.

This book shows the ultimate selflessness of the Holy Spirit as the member of the Trinity who always works for the glory of God the Father and God the Son and the good of the saints.

Ideal for pastors, teachers, and students of theology, this book is a superb theology of the Holy Spirit.

Buy @:

Crossway for $30.00 (with free PDF of book)
Amazon for $19.80
CBD for $21.99
BAMM for $21.00
Wal-Mart for $19.01

Other books by Graham A. Cole:

Engaging with the Holy Spirit (2007)

Initial Thoughts:

Over the past couple of years, I have come to love and appreciate this fantastic series (Foundations of Evangelical Theology) published by Crossway and edited by John Feinberg.  This welcomed edition on the doctrine of the Holy Spirit takes the perspective of biblical theology as Cole carefully examines the ministry of the Holy Spirit in both the Old and New Testaments.  There is probably not another doctrine that is so misunderstood and under-appreciated in Evangelicalism than the person and work of the Holy Spirit.  But more than that, this is not about a doctrine.  This book is about a Person–the third person in the Godhead.  Perhaps this book could navigate the contemporary Christian from the excesses that occur in the study of the Holy Spirit through a biblical-theological approach that also fuels a passion to know Him who gives us life, indwells us, and enables us to glorify Christ.  If you are looking for one book on the Holy Spirit, be sure to check out He Who Gives Life.

Endorsements:

“This latest addition to the Foundations of Evangelical Theology series maintains the high standard already set. Graham Cole has written the widest-ranging textbook on pneumatology that currently exists. Meticulous and sharp in handling texts, and scrupulous on matters of method, he offers us cool, clear, sober answers to more questions about the Holy Spirit than probably any of us have hitherto thought to ask. New ground is not broken, but solid ground of a mainstream Reformed sort is set forth throughout. Well done, Dr. Cole!”
- J. I. Packer, Professor of Theology, Regent College

“Dr. Graham Cole’s superbly written book is a thorough biblical and theological study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit that may well become a standard work on the subject. The volume is marked by careful exegesis of the scriptural references to the Spirit, each of which is interpreted within the salvation-historical flow of God’s redemptive purposes. A convinced Trinitarian theologian, Dr. Cole listens carefully to the contributions made by earlier generations of Christian writers from a range of disciplines, including biblical studies, systematic theology, and historical theology. Authors from both the Eastern and Western traditions are drawn in as pertinent, and challenging questions for our generation are raised. Issues of doctrine, understanding, and experience are drawn together in this fine book as the author guides his readers in appropriate worship of the Triune God, Father, Son, and Spirit.”
- Peter T. O’Brien, Senior Research Fellow in New Testament, Moore Theological College, Australia
____________

Graham A. Cole is professor of biblical and systematic theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. An ordained Anglican minister, he has served in two parishes and was formerly the principal of Ridley College, University of Melbourne. He has written articles for numerous theological journals and has contributed to several books as well as authoring Engaging with the Holy Spirit.

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  • john patrick

    This comment has nothing to do with your book alert, but about “bct.” Last night, in our men’s study (middle school guys to a 92yr. old), I gave an 1.5 hour overview of biblical theology. I used Vaughan Roberts’s “Kingdom of God” categories (people of God in the place of God under the rule of God) and traced those three elements through four major “sections” of redemptive history (before the fall, after the fall, in Christ, and eternity).

    We’ve been working through the book of Galatians on Wednesday nights. Last night, we focused on Gal. 5:14 in which Paul commands the church to “love your neighbor as yourself.” At this point I raised the question, “If Paul is quoting Leviticus 19:18 and Leviticus 19:18 is a command for Israel, why does Paul give that command to the church? Moreover, how should we understand Paul’s “OT command” in light of vs. 13, which says we are “called to freedom” from the law.

    After raising that question, I then took them through an overview of biblical theology. To end the overview I asked, “Now, given what we have already learned in Galatians, and given God’s big plan for history, why does Paul take a command directed at Israel and give it to the church.” To put it another way, how does Galatians 5:13-14 fit into God’s plan?”

    After a moment of silence a TENTH GRADER raised his hand and said, “Is it because Christ is the true Israel who kept the law perfectly, and we are now in Christ and filled with the Holy Spirit so that we are able to obey God’s moral law and to love each other with a before-the-fall type of love…and does that mean we are the new Israel?”

    I almost hit the roof. A tenth grader grasping biblical theology! How amazing is that!? When we finished the lesson, men were making comments like, “I feel like I just read the Bible for the first time” and “It’s like I traded a black and white television for a color one.” Several of the men even went home and told their wives all about “this new way of seeing how the Bible fits together.” Some of the ladies have called today and asked me to combine the men and women for a 3-4 week overview of biblical theology.

    I hope this encourages you as you continue your bct posts. I’m laboring with you for the same cause.

  • http://timmybrister.wordpress.com/ Timmy Brister

    John,

    You need to be careful about getting this stuff out there. Those developing curriculum for youth might get a little worried! ;)

    Seriously, that is a great story and a wonderful testament what “the pillar and buttress of truth” is all about. It’s all too sobering to realize that such a story is an exception and not the norm.

    Keep up the great work, brother, and continue to expound the excellencies of Jesus to God’s people!