In recent weeks, I have found myself reflecting quite a bit on the past 15 years of my life. I am not exactly sure why (perhaps it is because I have been an adult for almost 50% of my life?), but as I shared with a college-aged student yesterday, there is no way I could have mapped out the course my life has taken.

When I came to embrace the doctrines of grace, I did not enter the typical “cage stage” that people talk about. For me, the sovereignty of God was my lifeline. Either God was in control of every detail of my life for my good and his glory, or I had really no point in believing or living out my faith. In a short period of time, my world was rocked time and again.

In my first position at a local church, I served with several of my roommates and friends, all who came to embrace the doctrines of grace at some point in that journey of college life. While I was the least Reformed at that point, I guess you could say I had the roughest experience. My tenure at the church did not last long as I was physically threatened while being “kicked out” (not excommunicated but threatened to leave) by the senior pastor and education pastor (who called me “Absalom” and verbally assaulted me for 3 hours). That’s not the way you want to begin a lifelong call to gospel ministry to say the least. What happened in those early days were formative moments that would mark my life forever, and I am profoundly grateful to God for the brothers He placed in my life.

Over time, all of my brothers from those college years went their separate ways. We represented, I suppose you could say, the early stages of the young, restless, and Reformed movement. In the following years, the debate over Calvinism would hit a feverish pitch, mostly with charges that Calvinism stifles missions/evangelism and kills churches. This blog was very involved in the early years of the debate to offer rebuttals to many of the critiques that were leveled against Calvinists in the SBC, and it is without question that people loved to debate Calvinism (my stats were way higher then than they are today).

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If you don’t know Octavius Winslow, let me introduce him to you with this September 5 devotion from his excellent devotional, Morning Thoughts (kindle version here for just $0.99). In today’s devotion, he exhibits deep, Trinitarian thought to the salvation we have received from God. Hard to find such richness in today’s literature…

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“Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh.” Romans 8:12

THAT around a subject so momentous as this no obscurity might gather, tending to misguide the judgment, the apostle most distinctly and emphatically affirms, that the flesh has no valid claim whatever upon the believer; and that, consequently, he is under no obligation to yield compliance with its feigned exactions. We are debtors, but the flesh in not our creditor. What are its demands with which it is incumbent upon us to comply? Do we owe anything to sin, the parent of all our woe? Nothing. To Satan, who plotted our temptation, and accomplished our downfall? Nothing. To the world—ensnaring, deceitful, and ruinous? Nothing. No; to these, the auxiliaries of allies of the flesh, we owe nothing but the deepest hatred and the most determined opposition.

Debtors to the Father

And yet the saints of God are “debtors.” To whom? What debtors are they to the Father, for His electing love, for the covenant of grace, for His unspeakable gift, for having blessed us with all spiritual blessings in Christ Jesus! We but imperfectly estimate the debt of love, gratitude, and service which we owe to Him whose mind the Eternal Son came to reveal, whose will He came to do, and whose heart He came to unveil. It was the Father who sent the Son. With Him originated the wondrous expedient of our redemption. He it was who laid all our sins on Jesus. It was His sword of Justice that smote the Shepherd, while His hand of love and protection was laid upon the little ones. We have too much supposed that the Atonement of Jesus was intended to inspire the mercy, rather than to propitiate the justice of God; to awaken in His heart a love that did not previously exist. Thus we have overlooked the source from where originated our salvation, and have lost sight of the truth, that the mediation of Jesus was not the cause, but rather the effect, of God’s love to man. “Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us, and gave His Son to be a propitiation for our sins.” Oh, for the spirit to understand, and for grace to feel, and for love to exemplify, our deep obligation to God for the everlasting love that gave us His Son!

Debtors to the Son

Equal debtors are we to the Son. He was the active agent in our redemption. He it was who undertook and accomplished all that our salvation required. He left no path untrodden, no portion of the curse unborne, no sin unatoned, no part of the law uncancelled—nothing for us in the matter of our salvation to do, but simply to believe and be saved. Oh, to raise the eye to Him—strong in faith, beaming with love, moist with contrition, and exclaim, “You have borne my sin, endured my curse, extinguished my hell, secured my heaven. Your Spirit was wounded for me; Your heart bled for me; Your body was bruise for me; for me Your soul was stricken—for me, a sinner, the chief of sinners. I am Your debtor—a debtor to Your dying love, to Your eternal, discriminating mercy. Surely an eternity of love, of service, and of praise, can never repay You what I owe You, You blessed Jesus.” Oh, how deep the obligation we are under to Christ!

Debtors to the Holy Spirit

And not less indebted are we to the Holy Spirit. What do we not owe Him of love and obedience, who awoke the first thrill of life in our soul; who showed to us our guilt, and sealed to us our pardon? What do we not owe Him for leading us to Christ; for dwelling in our hearts; for His healing, sanctifying, comforting, and restoring grace; for His influence, which no ingratitude has quenched; for His patience, which no backsliding has exhausted; for His love, which no sin has annihilated? Yes, we are the Spirit’s lasting debtors. We owe Him the intellect He has renewed, the heart He has sanctified, the body He inhabits, every breath of life He has inspired, and every pulse of love He has awakened. Thus are all real believers debtors to the Triune God—debtors to the Father’s everlasting love, to the Son’s redeeming grace, and to the Spirit’s quickening mercy. To the flesh we owe nothing but uncompromising hatred; to Jehovah we owe undivided and supreme affection.

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GameDay Y’all

Tim Brister —  August 30, 2014 — Leave a comment

Roll Tide people everywhere. Let the trash talking begin.

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The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a huge success by any standard. I don’t think there has been a more viral fundraising strategy that has saturated the streams of every person on social media. However, along with this success, there has also come some scrutiny over how this non-profit allocates its money for the causes it represents.

For example, as I came across my news feed on Facebook, someone had posted this article from Red Flag News where it is reported that 27% of the donations to ALS actually goes to research and cures. This, of course, is intended to be unacceptable for nonprofits. Then they proceed to do the financial breakdown of the salaries of organizational leaders to add fuel to the indignation, along with the mention that 14% of their incomes goes to fundraising.

Of course, what this is supposed to do is question the integrity of the organization, raise suspicion about its legitimacy, and call for more accountability and probes into its operations. In contrast, the article proceeds to talk about other organizations where the overhead is remarkably low, and one even where it is said that 100% of the money you give goes directly to the cause (high quality foods). Ah, yes, this is what we want, right?

But wait.

You see, that is exactly what I thought.

Until I started leading a nonprofit organization of my own.

Have you ever considered what an organization looks like where 100% of your money goes to the cause with nothing going to the organization? Have you ever wondered how the organization supports itself? How the leaders get paid? How the word even gets out that this organization exists and why its causes are worthy of your support? Most often we don’t because we are stuck with the “we want nonprofits with low overheads where all of our money goes to the cause” with little thought to the capacity of the organization or its ability to actually solve problems, change lives, and make lasting change.

Would you want a gift to an organization where 100% of your gift goes to feeding the poor if the organization making it happen only feeds a few children? Or would you want to give to an organization where a smaller percentage of your gift goes to the poor but the organization has a scale exponentially larger because you not only invested in the cause but the high-quality organization that is making it happen at massively larger capacity than the 100% gift organization? What matters most? The giving purist with little to no change or the powerhouse changing the world?

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Yesterday, I provided 4 reasons why David Platt should be the next president of the IMB. Within a few hours of posting that article, it was announced that he was indeed elected to this position. News about his election reverberated across social media to the point that his name was trending nationally on Twitter. I tried to keep up with several of the responses to the breaking news, and you can find those highlighted responses and articles at the bottom of the right sidebar where my twitter “favorites” can be found. But of all the responses I am most desiring to hear is the men and women who are on the front lines with the IMB giving their lives for the unreached peoples of the world. What do they think of David Platt as their new president?

This morning, one of my dear friends sent me this note (unsolicited by me). He has served with the IMB for nearly a decade and is a strategy coordinator who working among unreached peoples of South Asia. As you will see, he has actually worked with David Platt there. I asked for his permission to share this publicly (name and located removed of course), and he was glad for me to share this with others. I hope you are as encouraged by it as I am.

Hey Tim,

I appreciated your article about David. We have been blessed over the past few years to have him come and work along side our teams in [South Asia]. Through these encounters with him I have learned all the things you highlighted. His books have challenged us and his willingness to get in the trenches with us has blessed us. For these reasons we have prayed for years that God would lead him to lead us as our president. The news from yesterday of his election brought tears of joy and a renewed excitement for the future of our organization.

While we are excited about David being president, we are more excited about what this means for the 1.2 billion lost people in our country who desperately need an advocate like David to challenge the body of Christ to wake up and in joy sacrifice to make Christ know. I hope all is well with you and your family. We pray for you often.

Blessings in Christ,

May God indeed use David Platt to awaken us to the plight of those desperately need Jesus!

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